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Time for surveillance transparency


Today the three heads of Britain's intelligence agencies appear infront of Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee in a televised hearing, the first time for such a hearing to be broadcast. Progress, yes, but let's not get ahead of ourselves - the head of the CIA first appeared on TV speaking to congress in 1975, so it's hardly a revolution in oversight. Today we have published new polling by

GCHQ faces legal action over mass surveillance


Today Big Brother Watch, working with the Open Rights Group, English PEN and German internet activist Constanze Kurz, has announced legal papers have been filed alleging that GCHQ has illegally intruded on the privacy of millions of British and European citizens. We allege that by collecting vast amounts of data leaving or entering the UK, including the content of emails and social media messages, the UK’s spy

Patients win choice of sharing medical records


Earlier this year, we led the concern that a new NHS data sharing plan would see every patient's medical records uploaded to a new information system without the right to opt-out. We warned at the time that patient records would be out of patient control. On Friday, the Secretary of State confirmed that this will not be the case. We have worked closely with MedConfidential and Privacy International to ensure

Boom in private investigators risks avoiding surveillance regulation


Our latest report highlights the growing use of private investigators by local and public authorities, particularly the number of times they are used without RIPA authorisation. The law in the UK, particularly the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, is broadly drawn to allow evidence to be introduced in court that in other jurisdictions would not be deemed admissible. Contrasted with the fruit of the poisonous

Nothing like a big sporting occasion…

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Home | 4 Comments

Olympic security …to really bring out the authoritarianism in our authorities.

As reported in the Times this morning:

Police are planning to use an anti-terror law deemed unlawful by the European Court of Human Rights across the country during the London Olympics.

Senior officers are considering using Section 44 of the Terrorism Act 2000 at every Underground and railway station nationwide.

This decision does, of course, completely ignore last month's European Court judgement, ruling random stop and search illegal. Remember: there has never been a successful conviction for terrorist offences resulting from the use of Section 44. 

But in terms of liberty in Britain today, it is the words of Mr Thomas, the Olympic National Transport Security Co-ordinator for the Home Office, that are really concerning:

“We are planning on the assumption that there will be a severe threat to the UK during the Games, on the basis that we can then scale down rather than quickly scale up.”

This should not be the default position of security in Britain. Given that the hyperbolic threat level in Britain hasn't fallen below 'severe' since it was first made public in August 2006, what chance is there that these illegal stop and searches will see any scaling back before, during or after the Games?

Any excuse for this government.

By Dylan Sharpe

Alex Deane argues against full-body scanners on BBC Breakfast

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Body Scanners, Media coverage | 13 Comments

Wigan Council loses the data of 200 disabled residents

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Databases | 8 Comments

Wigan Well, the headline says it all, really – but here's the story. In sum:

Wigan Council believes a memory stick containing hundreds of confidential details fell out of an employee's pocket

To which I'd say, (1) This was back in January – shouldn't that be ex-employee? (2) Doesn't this say something to those who want more government databases?

You'll note that we have a "losing data" tag on the site. It's merited because it happens so often. 

By Alex Deane

Australia in landmark ruling on file-sharing

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Privacy | 1 Comment

As Britain moves perilously towards a new culture of regulating the previously unregulated world of the internet, a landmark ruling was made yesterday by our antipodean counterparts. 

Global-broadband An Australian court ruled that the country's third-largest broadband operator cannot be held responsible for the actions of illegal file-sharers.

As reported over at the Guardian:

iiNet was being sued by more than 30 film and TV studios, including Village Roadshow, Universal, Sony and Warner Bros, for allowing its users to download copyrighted material. Sydney's federal court, however, ruled that the company cannot be held liable for the downloading habits of its customers. If iiNet had lost the case it would essentially have been required to police its users on behalf of copyright holders.

The politics of the internet is never going to be simple, but creating criminals out of people who are merely using the technology available to them is a massive infringement of liberty. Touching upon this, Michael Malone, iiNet's co-founder, said

"we've probably wasted a year. When iiNet, the internet industry and the rights holders could have been working together to find better models.” 

While this ruling will not directly impact upon British law, it will be encouraging news for UK based Internet Service Provider’s such as TalkTalk, who have publically opposed impending legalisation that will require ISP’s to not only police their customers – but to disconnect those suspected of ‘illegal’ filesharing. 

This is, I believe, a positive step towards recognising our right to privacy. Let’s hope the British courts follow Australia’s lead.

By Edward Hockings

Our surveillance state – intrusive and ineffective

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in CCTV, ID cards | 2 Comments

BanksyCCTV Two stories have caught my eye this morning that provide a perfect summation of the current progress of Britain's surveillance state.

The first comes from the Daily Telegraph via Manchester:

Man can't prove ID with ID card

Darren McTeggart tried to use the £30 ID card to pick up a replacement credit card from a branch of Santander in Manchester, where the scheme was rolled out on a voluntary basis last year.

Mr McTeggart, one of the first people to get the card, said: “They said it was not on their list of approved ID.

“I sent an email to the head office, but they wouldn’t budge. The government has been pushing this card on TV and elsewhere so it beggars belief why the bank won’t accept it.”

The second comes courtesy of the Gloucester Citizen:

Broken CCTV missed vandal attack

Businessman Barry Clayton was left fuming when his shop window was smashed and he discovered a CCTV camera opposite was not working.

He said: “On Saturday night, one of our shop windows was kicked in. We had hoped that it might have been caught on camera. There would have been a really good chance of getting some evidence off it.

“But we’ve looked at the camera – which was just a few yards away high up on a wall – today and yesterday and it’s facing the wall that it’s mounted on. Its main field of vision will just be the cream-coloured wall that it’s on.”

So there we have it. Mr McTeggart presumably foolishly jumped at the chance to get an ID card because the government had told him that it was a much simpler and easier form of identification; while Mr Clayton had always assumed that the council CCTV camera opposite his shop would deter criminals but catch any who chanced an attack on his shop.

Intrusive and ineffective – Big Brother Watch's surveillance State of the Union.

By Dylan Sharpe

Big Brother Watch Newsletter 29.01.10

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Home | Comments Off

Dear Supporter,


 


It has been another busy week for officious policemen and intrusive council inspectors, whose misdemeanors and often absurd behaviour we have catalogued at http://www.bigbrotherwatch.org.uk/ – more on this, and our latest campaign, shortly. But first, in case you missed it, is a story given minimal coverage in the national press but deserving of far wider recognition.


 


The Guardian has got hold of leaked documents from South Coast Partnership (a link-up between Kent Police and the Home Office) which suggests that they are planning to use unmanned spy drones, controversially deployed in Afghanistan, for the “routine” monitoring of anti-social motorists, protesters, agricultural thieves and fly-tippers.


 


Our full report is available here, but needless to say, Big Brother Watch is outraged that the government could even consider increasing the level of state surveillance in Britain even further, and doing so by sending CCTV into the sky. There can be only a handful of people in the country who want to see their skies clouded with unmanned spy planes and we are confident that any attempts to implement this proposal will be met with strong public opposition. As ever, we will keep you informed of developments and if you hear of anything that we should know about please do email us at [email protected].


 



Is there nothing for which they won’t fine us?


 


Many of you will already have read about Michael Mancini – the Ayrshire businessman who is being taken to court by his local council for failing to pay a fine issued when he blew his nose whilst stationery in his car. When this story broke, just as we did with Vanessa Kelly – the young mother fined for feeding the ducks – Big Brother Watch contacted Michael’s lawyer and pledged our support in his battle to stop this ridiculous trial.


 


Alex Deane, the Director of Big Brother Watch, has written exclusively in the Independent today explaining why Michael’s case is sadly not a one-off and how the British public, who are increasingly been vicitmised and turned into criminals for the most banal and pointless reasons, can fight back. As he writes:


 


Donning the uniform of office doesn’t – or shouldn’t – entail unlimited power to exact petty bureaucracy. It ought to come with discretion, with common sense. Failing that, let’s try to bully them back.


 


 


Blogs of the Week


 


Kid’s TV presenters stopped by police whilst wielding hairdryers - equipped with plastic utility belts, over-sized walkie talkies and glittery hairdryers (and pursued by a camera crew) the presenters of Toonattik are prevented from filming in London by anti-terror police


 


Jeepers, creepers, where’d ya get them peepers - great news as the ICO announces it will be investigating the chilling online CCTV watching game, ‘Internet Eyes’


 


John Gaunt’s case is an important test for freedom of speech - regular interviewer of Big Brother Watch spokesmen and current presenter on SunTalk, Jon ‘Gaunty’ Gaunt arrives before the High Court to defend our right to free speech  


 


 


Media Coverage



- – Coming Up: Tune into BBC Breakfast on BBC 1 and BBC News24 to watch Alex Deane debate the use of full-body scanners with Transport Secretary, Lord Andrew Adonis – -

The Independent – Alex Deane: How the march of officialdom is destroying cherished ways of life 


City AM – Alex Deane: When you liberate your employees, productivity and profit will follow


Waltham Forest Guardian – CCTV locations move branded “publicity stunt” 


ConservativeHome – Search for 100 Peers: Shami Chakrabarti

Human Events – 1,043 Ways For Government to Enter Your Home


At Big Brother Watch, we conducted the first nationwide survey of the number of officers in each Local Authority holding the power to enter a private home or business without requiring a warrant or police escort


We found almost 15,000 such inspectors. About a quarter of councils didn’t respond at all or didn’t respond fully, so it’s reasonable to suppose that the true figure is somewhere near 20,000.


LBC 97.3 FM - Dylan Sharpe interviewed by Nick Ferrari on the Breakfast Show


Daily Telegraph – Revealed: Britons to be asked for NI number, date of birth and signature to get right to vote


Alex Deane, a spokesman from civil liberties group Big Brother Watch, said: “We have managed to have elections in this country without surrendering this sort of information for hundreds of years.


“This is a very small issue in this country, and is driven mostly by postal voting. If you have to go on database to vote some people might say ‘forget it then’.”


Daily Mail – Britons will be ‘forced to hand over NI number, date of birth and signature to get voting rights’

CCTV designed to spot ‘suspicious behaviour’

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in CCTV, Europe | 12 Comments

Having published our report concerning the British Isles’ submergence in CCTV, there is now cause for concern that CCTV will soon being doing more than just watching us. It seems that the prospect of unmanned airborne spy drones is only the begining.

An outfit dedicated to covering the European Security Research Programme named NeoConOptican, reported yesterday that the European Commission are funding a project called Samurai –  a “next generation” CCTV system, which is, they write: 

capable of identifying and tracking individuals “acting suspiciously” in crowded public spaces. The project has received €2.5 million in EU funding under the Fp7 security research programme.

The blurb on the official Samurai project website, makes it clear that their intention is take surveillance to a whole new level:

Existing systems focus on analysing recorded video. SAMURAI is to develop a real-time adaptive behaviour profiling and abnormality detection system for alarm event alert and prediction.

We aim to develop an abnormal detection system based on a heterogeneous sensor network consisting of both fix-positioned CCTV cameras and mobile wearable cameras with audio and positioning sensors.

These networked heterogeneous sensors will function cooperatively to provide enhanced situation awareness.

There we have it. Research into surveillance systems designed to identify and follow unusual behaviour and which are capable of tracking people, vehicles and luggage are being funded by our contributions to the EU.

Let’s picture the future: a spring afternoon, in 2015, silent Drones hover above our head; cameras equipped with the ability to listen to the conversation I am having surround me; images of the Golfing equipment I’m carrying are being sent across the system as possible weapons of mass destruction.

Samurai is just the beginning. The potential is frightening. 

By Edward Hockings 

Lord Chief Justice questions on-the-spot fines

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Home | 2 Comments

On-the-spot fines have played an enormous part in creating criminals out of otherwise law-abiding British people.

Lord-Judge Vanessa Kelly – the young mum issued with a fixed penalty notice for littering when she threw bread to the ducks in a park – and Michael Mancini – the businessman fighting Ayr Council over an FPN received when he blew his nose in his car while stopped at traffic lights – are two examples we have covered, but there are many more who have silently paid-up having been fined for pointless and pernicious non-crimes.

It is therefore with some cheer that we see that the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, has today in the Telegraph admitted that he is "troubled" by the increased use of on-the-spot fines, saying:

"I welcome the review launched by the Lord Chancellor and I hope that it will lead to material changes in the way fixed penalty notices, cautions and conditional cautions are used."

This change can't come soon enough. As the Magistrates' Association recently warned, police cannot be trusted to hand out summary justice and will act as "judge and jury" if given powers to issue more on-the-spot fines.

We will follow the results of Jack Straw's review with interest.

By Dylan Sharpe

A presumption of future possible guiltyishness

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in DNA database | 8 Comments

Today the Home Affairs Select Committee heard evidence on the retention of innocent DNA samples from Sir Alec Jeffreys - the man who developed techniques for DNA fingerprinting and DNA profiling which are now used all over the world.

Professor-Sir-Alec-Jeffreys While Big Brother Watch could sadly not be there, the tireless Lobbydog - a prolific blogger of Westminster gossip – has provided a brief transcript of the key exchanges that I felt were worth sharing on our blog.

As reported by Lobbydog:

“If my DNA were to be put on the database I would object profoundly against that,” said Sir Alec Jeffreys at a hearing of the Home Affairs Committee.

“What advantage is it to me, as an entirely blameless citizen? The best outcome is that my DNA would sit there cluttering up a fridge and that my DNA profile would sit there cluttering up the database.

“The worst that could happen is that there is some glitch in the database that made a false match to my DNA profile and that brings me into the frame of a criminal investigation which has very serious repercussions.”

Crucially, Sir Alec finished by saying that if he’d known his DNA analysis would be used by the Government in the way it has, he’d have been “astonished, perplexed and deeply worried”.

“I’ve always understood that one of the great foundations of English law was a presumption of innocence, but obviously now there is a presumption of future possible guiltyishness,” he said.

He makes several other excellent points against why innocent DNA should be removed from the database (including the increased likelihood of false matches between family members – who share similar DNA profiles) – the full report really is a must read.

By Dylan Sharpe

Another state database is not the answer, Mike

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Databases | Leave a comment

Mike Freer, the former leader of Barnet council in north London and now Conservative candidate in Finchley and Golders Green, has an extended interview in the Guardian this morning.

Easycouncil As the self-styled "architect" of the easyCouncil approach to local government – whereby residents are asked to pay a flat-rate of council tax for the standard services provided by the authority, but have the option of paying extra tax for additional services – Mike has shown that he understands the need for efficiency, particularly in our current economic climate.

However, efficiency should never be gained by compromising values of privacy and freedom and building more state databases - values which his party leadership have frequently claimed are a priority – but he makes this very mistake in his interview, saying:

Other ideas in this vein include a "common database" on individuals that would prevent people being approached time and time again by "different arms of the state".  

This sounds ominously similar to the ideas of Sir David Varney, who urged government departments to focus on the ‘totality of the relationship with the citizen’, ‘identity management’ and creating ‘a single source of truth’ on the citizen.

Databases are not the answer to efficiency. They invariably either go wrong (and thus the data they spit out results in people being unfairly treated) or – as is particularly the case with state databases – some absent-minded civil servant leaves a laptop on the train or his briefcase in a coffee shop and the data falls into the wrong hands.

Sorry, but you need to go back to the easyDrawing-Board on this one, Mike. 

By Dylan Sharpe