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Time for surveillance transparency


Today the three heads of Britain's intelligence agencies appear infront of Parliament's Intelligence and Security Committee in a televised hearing, the first time for such a hearing to be broadcast. Progress, yes, but let's not get ahead of ourselves - the head of the CIA first appeared on TV speaking to congress in 1975, so it's hardly a revolution in oversight. Today we have published new polling by

GCHQ faces legal action over mass surveillance


Today Big Brother Watch, working with the Open Rights Group, English PEN and German internet activist Constanze Kurz, has announced legal papers have been filed alleging that GCHQ has illegally intruded on the privacy of millions of British and European citizens. We allege that by collecting vast amounts of data leaving or entering the UK, including the content of emails and social media messages, the UK’s spy

Patients win choice of sharing medical records


Earlier this year, we led the concern that a new NHS data sharing plan would see every patient's medical records uploaded to a new information system without the right to opt-out. We warned at the time that patient records would be out of patient control. On Friday, the Secretary of State confirmed that this will not be the case. We have worked closely with MedConfidential and Privacy International to ensure

Boom in private investigators risks avoiding surveillance regulation


Our latest report highlights the growing use of private investigators by local and public authorities, particularly the number of times they are used without RIPA authorisation. The law in the UK, particularly the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, is broadly drawn to allow evidence to be introduced in court that in other jurisdictions would not be deemed admissible. Contrasted with the fruit of the poisonous

Care.data delay is not the end of the issue

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Databases, Information Commissioner, NHS | 7 Comments

Times_caredataIn a campaign victory for Big Brother Watch, medconfidential and others, the care.data scheme has been delayed for six months.

This is not the end of the issue. We have significant ongoing concerns regarding the care.data scheme, both in terms of how patients have been told about what is happening and the long term privacy implications of creating a new database and releasing data that could be used to re-identify patients.

We welcome the fact that NHS England has recognised its efforts to communicate the scheme have been inadequate, something we have repeatedly warned about, not least the use of a junk mail leaflet to households that did not mention any of the risks involved.

Simply, however, NHS England had one job – to ensure patients and GPs were properly aware of the scheme and could make an informed choice about participation. Despite more than a year to achieve this, they have totally failed to do so. NHS England has serious questions to ask about its strategy that has tried to railroad through a significant change in how our medical records are used.

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Care.data – rhetoric is easy but the reality is not so simple

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Databases, Information Commissioner, Medical Records, NHS | 2 Comments

3797160719_337b4742e7_bToday two articles have appeared on care.data, with are worthy of a few comments.

Firstly, George Freeman MP writes in the Telegraph:

“We must do everything to ensure a robust regime that will protect data from hacking and from any potential misuse. But at the same time, we must not block life-saving advances.”

As we have repeatedly pointed out, the Data Protection Regime is woefully inadequate and those who committ a criminal offence under Section 55 of the DPA cannot be sent to prison, merely fined. Mr Freeman does not suggest this should change, as we have repeatedly called for.

Equally, Mr Freeman writes: “we need to move health from being something done to you by government to something citizens take responsibility for themselves”

Interestingly, Mr Freeman also has his own legislation on this topic – the Patient Data Bill. The first two principles the bill states are:

(2) The Ownership Principle is that patients own their medical data.
(3) The Control Principle is that patients have the right to access their medical data and to control its use (including the right to share it for research or other purposes).

Yet care.data does neither of those things – quite the opposite. If you believe in people controlling their records, pulling them into a central database purely on the back of a junk mailing is hardly making patient ownership and control a reality.

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Police staff forced to quit after snooping on familes and lovers

Posted on by Emma Carr Posted in Data Protection, Databases, Police | 2 Comments

keyboardFrom passing on incorrect information to snooping on friends, a number of shocking data protection breaches in police forces have been uncovered. With hundreds of incidents every year it is time to start asking whether it is too easy for police databases to be abused to snoop on innocent people.

Big Brother Watch has long been concerned about the number of data breaches occurring within police forces. In 2011, we published the report ‘Police Databases: How More Than 900 Staff Abused Their Access’. The report highlighted a shocking number of data protection breaches and the subsequent limited number of punishments that were handed out. We also commented on the recent case of a police officer being charged with stealing thousands of accident victims’ details from her police force’s computer to sell to law firms.

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Paper on security and privacy for the ISC

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in CCDP, Civil Liberties, Communications Data Bill, Databases, GCHQ, Information Commissioner, Legal Action, Mastering the Internet, Online privacy, Technology, Terrorism Legislation, United States | Leave a comment

Big Brother Watch was invited to submit a paper to the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament, relating to it’s inquiry into the balance between security and privacy.BNUARLICcAAiyCZ.jpg large

You can now read our submission below.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

In a Democratic society, some secrecy is tolerated, as are some intrusions upon liberty and privacy, provided the legal framework is transparency, the oversight mechanisms robust and the overall sacrifices of liberty made with an appropriate level of understanding.

Recent revelations have made clear the scale of intrusion on our privacy in the name of security, enabled by an explosion in digital communications and the computing resources available to the state.

Ministers have assured the public no central database of internet communications would be created. We now know it existed already. Parliament and the public were not informed by Ministers, the Intelligence and Security Committee or the Commissioners.

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GP exposes bullying tactics behind care.data scheme

Posted on by Emma Carr Posted in NHS | 14 Comments

3797160719_337b4742e7_bAs NHS England remains adamant to push through the care.data scheme despite concerns not being properly addressed, it was only a matter of time before GP’s started to publicly speak about. Unsurprisingly this has not gone down well with NHS England.

A GP in Oxford has accused the NHS of using ‘blatantly bullying’ tactics to ‘bulldoze’ doctors and patients into complying with the scheme. The government has made several statements about the fact that GP’s are responsible for their patients’ data, yet it now appears that they are being told that they aren’t able to act when they have genuine concerns.

Dr Gancz has revealed that he received a ‘threatening’ email from Thames Valley NHS England warning him that he would be ‘in breach of his contract’ if he did not automatically opt his patients in to the scheme. He said it also contained the ‘Big Brother-ish’ demand that he remove a statement on his surgery’s website which warned patients that he was ‘concerned’ about the scheme.

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Deregulation Bill must not undermine journalist freedom

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Freedom of Expression, Leveson, Police | Leave a comment

papersThe Deregulation Bill, debated by MPs today, has caused alarm after it was highlighted that one of its clauses, which alters the process for obtaining production orders with regard to material held by journalists, significantly undermines the essential protections for journalists from being forced to hand over material to the police.

Of particular concern is a warning from Gavin Millar QC, who is currently representing BSkyB in a case where the Metropolitan Police are seeking material from them, is that this change could be combined with a ‘Closed Material Procedure’ – where a court sits in closed, or secret, session – and would mean the media is not present, or in some cases even notified of the hearing, when the police make an application to seize material.

Currently requests for material belonging to a journalist or media organisation must be made in open court, with the opportunity for challenge by the organisation affected. The combined effect of this change and closed material proceedings could lead to a situation where a judge is asked to consider a production order in a secret hearing without adversarial debate between the requesting body and the media organisation involved.

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EU Chief wants to block ‘undesirable’ content on the web

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Europe, Freedom of Expression, Internet freedom, Leveson, Web blocking | 17 Comments

europe flagYesterday the new European Union anti-terror chief appeared infront of MPs to discuss various issues, including what people are reading online.

As we’ve previously warned, the UK’s Anti-Extremism task force has already alluded to greater filtering of web content and now the EU has taken it one step further, with Gilles de Kerchove telling MPs he wanted to remove “not illegal, undesirable websites.”

Setting out the action being taken by the EU he said: “The Commissioner for Home Affairs will set up a forum to discuss with the big players – Google, Facebook, Twitter – how we can improve the way one removes from the internet the illegal and if not illegal, undesirable websites.”

Freedom of speech, and of the press, are essential parts of a free and democratic society. It should not be in the gift of politicians to decide what we read or who can write it and absolutely not on the basis of what some may consider undesirable. If content is to be blocked, it should be a decision taken by a court of law and only when a clear criminal test has been met establishing the content is illegal.

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Does Dishfire circumvent British law?

Posted on by Big Brother Watch Posted in Communications Data Bill, GCHQ, Mastering the Internet, Mobile Phones, Surveillance, United States | 2 Comments

phoneIf GCHQ or any other agency is obtaining mobile phone data through the Dishfire programme without a RIPA notice, that is circumventing British law.

The statements made have sought to only address questions about content being accessed, not metadata. This confusion should be urgently addressed.

Under UK law, if an agency or police force want access to details of who you have texted, where you were when you sent or received a text or the dates and times of your text massages they can obtain it from your phone company. The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) provides for this. Such powers relate to obtaining communications (or meta) data and not content.  Acquiring content requires a warrant from a Secretary of State.

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A win for the Reform Clause 1 Campaign

Posted on by Emma Carr Posted in Home | Leave a comment

reform clause 1There is great news to report from the Reform Clause 1 campaign. The Government has scrapped plans to outlaw annoying and nuisance behaviour in public.

Following a three month campaign by the Reform Clause 1 group and a key vote in the House of Lords earlier this month, where peers voted overwhelmingly for Lord Dear’s amendment to the legislation, the Government have today confirmed that they will accept the key changes.

We had been seriously concerned, along with other civil liberty groups, peers and MPs that plans to replace ASBOs with IPNAs would have a chilling effect on free speech and potentially outlaw many ordinary and hitherto legal activities. The Government had planned to extend the replacement to Labour’s ASBOs, by allowing the Courts to restrict any action “capable of causing nuisance or annoyance” by any person in any place. We warned that the wording and the low evidence thresholds in the Bill were dangerous as, almost anyone and any action was capable of being annoying, or causing a nuisance and would lead to a slew of ridiculous and costly cases.

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Get your tickets to The Freedom Festival

Posted on by Emma Carr Posted in Home | Leave a comment

FreedomFestivallogoWe are very pleased to announce details of The Freedom Festival, an amazing weekend for anyone who cares about freedom and liberty. From Friday 14 to Sunday 16 March, attendees will play an active part in discussions and debates about the big political, economic and moral issues.

Over the weekend, you’ll rub shoulders with some of the most inspirational pro-freedom speakers from the UK and overseas – Dan Hannan, Robin Harris, Ruth Lea, Mark Littlewood, Tom Palmer, Toby Young and many, many more. There will be politicians, writers, academics, journalists, economists and philosophers. Big Brother Watch’s deputy director, Emma Carr, will also be running an interactive session on the future of civil liberties.

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